These are the authors of the papers summarised.

 

Paul Okami, Richard Olmstead, Paul R. Abramson and Laura Pendleton

Early childhood exposure to parental nudity and scenes of parental sexuality ('primal scenes'): an 18-year longitudinal study of outcome. Archives of Sexual Behavior. Volume: 27. Issue: 4 (1998).

(In this redaction from the source, the matter of 'primal scenes' is largely excepted as irrelevant in the context of this site.)
 

Ronald J. Goldman and Juliette D. G. Goldman

Children's Perceptions of Clothes and Nakedness: A Cross-National Study. Genetic Psychology Monographs, 104 (1981). pp.163-185. The Goldmans interviewed 838 children from North America, England, Australia, and Sweden; ranging in age from 5 to 15 years old. Each child was individually interviewed and asked questions designed to elicit responses indicating the child's understanding of wearing clothing, nudity (as viewed by society), and modesty.

Show Me Yours! Understanding children's sexuality. New York: Penguin Books (1988). An interesting study by Goldman & Goldman (Latrobe University-Australia) asked children, "Do we need to wear clothes in a warm climate?"
 

Robin J. Lewis and Louis H. Janda

The Relationship Between Adult Sexual Adjustment and Childhood Experiences Regarding Exposure to Nudity, Sleeping in the Parental Bed, and Parental Attitudes Toward Sexuality. Archives of Sexual Behavior, vol.17, no.4 (1988). pp.349-362. They summarise: "Although a variety of experts have provided their opinion on this issue, empirical research has been lacking. In this study... college students were asked to retrospectively report on the frequency of sleeping in the parental bed as a child, the frequency of seeing others naked during childhood, and parental attitudes regarding sexuality. The results suggest that childhood experiences with exposure to nakedness and sleeping in the parental bed are not adversely related to adult sexual functioning and adjustment. In fact, there is modest support that these childhood experiences are positively related to indices of adjustment."
 

Marilyn D. Story

Factors associated with more positive body self-concepts in pre-school children. Journal of Social Psychology, 1979. School of Home Economics, University of Northern Iowa.

This research found that nudist children had body self-concepts that were significantly more positive than those of non-nudist children and that the "nudity classification" of a family was one of the most significant factors associated with positive body self-concept. Furthermore, nudist children showed a significantly higher acceptance of their bodies as a whole, rather than feeling ashamed of certain parts.

 

If you know of relevant, researchers not already listed here, please let us know! Thanks.